Author Archive

Restek’s First Twitter Lunch & Learn This Thursday, December 17th at 12:00PM EST

Hi there! Restek is excited to be hosting its first Twitter Lunch & Learn this Thursday, December 17th!  It’ll start at 12:00PM EST (UCT-5:00), and you’re invited to join us as we talk GC inlets! You can follow along by visiting: https://twitter.com/hashtag/AskRestek And you can actually join us by simply tweeting your question or comment, adding […]

The Customer’s Voice: How hot do you take your Press-Tight® column connectors?

Hi there!  I know that we frequently solicit your input on the blog, but I’m particularly interested in hearing about your experience with Press-Tight® column connectors.  I was just surprised by an observation we made in the lab, and I’d like to know if you have had similar experiences! My summer intern, Elena Woiciechowska, and […]

GC Troubleshooting: Using “No Injection Instrument Blanks”

Let’s cut to the chase.  Here’s the problem I was observing.  I had just performed injection port maintenance, replacing the septum, liner, and liner o-ring.  I thermally conditioned the system before use.  I injected a standard with two compounds, and my earlier eluting compound, endrin, appeared to be suffering from serious co-elutions.  Glommed on to […]

GC Inlet Liner Troubleshooting: When the problem isn’t your liner

I get a lot of ribbing from my colleagues because for the past two years I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about GC inlet liners.  I’m cool with that, and it isn’t because of my unshakable self esteem (actually, I’m quite sensitive, thank you very much).  It’s because I feel that my colleagues and […]

When your data goes BOING! An electrifying tale of FID troubleshooting!

Recently my colleagues were performing dual inlet/column/detector analyses of 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) using flame ionization detectors (FID) in an Agilent 6890 gas chromatograph.  They noticed something odd.  The results from the front side were considerably lower and less reproducible than those observed from the back, even though they were essentially set up the same way.  Bah!  […]

To Wool or not to Wool. That’s the Question! What are your thoughts?

Wool.  Savior?  Bane?  In hats it’s warm, but itchy.  In GC inlet liners it helps liquid-sample vaporization, but may create inertness problems.  There’s always a compromise, isn’t there (well maybe not with hats)?  After performing quite a bit of experimentation myself and reviewing what literature I could find on the matter, I hold the conviction […]

The Human Element

My last two posts have taken us through a couple of topics. Let’s review. First, we welcomed element 112, which was recently christened Copernicium. Then, we pondered the question of why the discoverers couldn’t give it the atomic symbol “Cp.” The answer was that it was already taken by the mysterious element Cassiopeium. Well, as […]

The Human Element continued…

You’ll note in the picture associated with the post “The Human Element” there was a continuation of the image. I post it here for those interested in seeing the rest of the story… P.S. The “Welcome to Innovations” was already there. :)

When Science and Mythology Meet (Bear with me…it’s another cartoon…)

Again, not a directly chromatography-related post, but a follow-up on my previous post (see two below). In that entry I asked why the discoverers of the newly minted Copernicium couldn’t give it the atomic symbol “Cp,” having to use “Cn” instead. I’m sure it’s with bated breath that you await the answer! One of the […]

A Revolution Recognized! Scientists honor famous astronomer with ultimate distinction.

So it isn’t chromatography, but as scientists I think we should welcome the newest member of an elite club. I’m talking about the recent official acceptance of Copernicium (Cn) into the pantheon of named elements. Element 112 has been with us for some time (actually, element 112 is never with us for long, being a […]