Archive for the ‘GCxGC’ Category

International Network of Environmental Forensics Conference in Örebro, Sweden

From the INEF website:  “The International Network of Environmental Forensics (INEF) was founded in 2008 to provide a forum for scientists, environmental consultants, regulators and lawyers to share information regarding the use of environmental forensics.  Environmental forensics is the use of scientific techniques to identify and apportion the source(s), age and timing of a contaminant […]

Preserving the First Dimension Separation in GCxGC

I mentioned in a recent blog post that to maximize peak capacity in GCxGC the first dimension separation needs to be preserved by having a very short second dimension separation (short modulation time), often on the order of 2 sec or less, even.  While maximizing peak capacity can be very important when trying to characterize a complex […]

Peak Capacity and Selectivity in Gas Chromatography

I recently had the pleasure of hearing Professor Taduesz Gorecki from the University of Waterloo lecture on comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC).   One of his chief areas of research is on the GCxGC modulator, which is essentially the “injector” for the second dimension column in this multidimensional chromatography approach.  A twist on the usual process from Taduesz […]

Restek at the 40th International Symposium on Capillary Chromatography and 13th GCxGC Symposium

Restek is proud to have numerous presentations in the orals scientific program for the 4oth ISCC and 13th GCxGC Symposium, which will take place in Riva del Garda, Italy in May. Exploding a Peak Capacity Increase Record by Using Hydrogen Carrier Gas for Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography – Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (Jack Cochran, Julie Kowalski, Christopher […]

The Promise of True Peak Capacity Increase GCxGC Realized

I mentioned in my last ChromaBLOGraphy post, Phthalate-Free Personal Care Products?, that we used GCxGC-TOFMS to determine phthalates in a Las Vegas Wash water sample.  While it doesn’t dive into specific compound identification, we recently published the first demonstration of a near theoretical maximum peak capacity gain for GCxGC (approximately 9x) in an open access […]

Phthalate-Free Personal Care Products?

In her recent ChromaBLOGraphy posts, Minimizing Phthalate Interferences Using the Rtx-CLPesticides/Rtx-CLPesticides2 Columns and EPA Regulated Phthalates FREE?, my colleague Dan Li pointed out the ubiquitous nature of phthalates in our world because of their widespread use in plastic consumer products, and that phthalates likely have adverse human health effects, including as endocrine disruptors.  Any of […]

Wildfires in the Western United States: The smoke can be as dangerous as the flames, especially for firefighters.

The drought continues and wildfires are raging across the Western United States.  In Washington State alone, the wildfires have burned over 1400 square miles (that’s 3600 km2).  Brave men and women from across the United States are coming to the aid and trying to contain these historical fires.  Unfortunately lives of the firefighters are in […]

Another cup of PAH tea please!

It seemed not too long ago that Julie Kowalski and I were analyzing tea, a lot of tea, and only tea.  To this day we cringe at the thought of tea, but hopefully our pain can be your gain. We analyzed pesticides, natural products, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in tea.   Julie and Amanda Rigdon […]

Which GC instrument should I use for the analysis of pesticides in herbal tea? GC-MS/MS or GCxGC-TOFMS?

You may remember a while ago I posted a blog about the analysis of herbal tea using QuEChERS and GCxGC-TOFMS.   The LECO Pegasus GCxGC-TOFMS is a great instrument for analyzing complex samples because of the comprehensive chromatographic separation achieved (two columns with different selectivities).  The GCxGC-TOFMS also excels at non-target screening of compounds.  Lucky for […]

Benzo[b]fluoranthene as part of the EFSA PAH4

I’ve already had one reader of my last post, Is separation of benzo[b]fluoranthene and benzo[k]fluoranthene on 5% phenyl-type GC columns really that important for environmental analyses? ask why I had benzo[b]fluoranthene in red text on the chromatograms.  I had planned to include something about it being on the EFSA PAH4 list in that post, but […]