Archive for the ‘Faster Analyses’ Category

EPA Method 541 on the Stabilwax Column

I recently posted some chromatograms for our new EPA Method 541 UCMR4 Standards, and wanted to focus on the column in a separate post. EPA Method 541 was developed on a 30m x 0.25 mm ID x 0.50 µm wax column from another manufacturer. I used the Stabilwax because it is a relatively low bleed […]

Restek at BFR2016 in Toronto – APGC of Brominated Flame Retardants Using Helium and Nitrogen Carrier Gases

In only a few short weeks, I will be giving a presentation on the analysis of brominated flame retardants at BFR2016 in Toronto.  My colleagues and I used an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer with gas chromatography on an Rtx-1614  (15m x 0.25mm x 0.10µm) column to look at polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in various […]

Fast Analysis of PAHs using Split Injection and a Short GC Column

Click on the this link:  Fast Analysis of PAHs  to see how I analyzed the EPA 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in under 10 min using GC-MS by employing split injection with a Restek Premium Precision split liner with wool and a 15m x 0.25mm x 0.25µm Rxi-5Sil MS GC column.  Split injection allows a higher GC oven […]

Changing from helium to nitrogen carrier gas in gas chromatography while maintaining separation efficiency and analysis time

In two recent ChromaBLOGraphy posts (see links below) I described the experimental implementation of an idea Jaap de Zeeuw had to use nitrogen carrier gas for GC while maintaining the same separation efficiency and analysis time as what could be achieved by helium carrier gas. Wait, that’s impossible, right?!  Not if you go from a […]

Fast gas chromatographic residue analysis in animal feed using split injection and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

In a recent ChromaBLOGraphy post I mentioned that we are doing a campaign on “shoot-and-dilute GC”, also known as split injection GC, at RAFA 2015. A paper just published by Tienstra, Portolés, Hernández, and Mol used split injection with APGC for pesticide and other residue analysis in animal feed to achieve many of the benefits we’ve been […]

The Promise of True Peak Capacity Increase GCxGC Realized

I mentioned in my last ChromaBLOGraphy post, Phthalate-Free Personal Care Products?, that we used GCxGC-TOFMS to determine phthalates in a Las Vegas Wash water sample.  While it doesn’t dive into specific compound identification, we recently published the first demonstration of a near theoretical maximum peak capacity gain for GCxGC (approximately 9x) in an open access […]

Restek’s EZGC Online Suite that includes the Method Translator and Flow Calculator, and a Chromatogram Modeler, wins a TASIA Award – Chris Nelson, One of the Suite Builders

The Analytical Scientist is a very smartly produced scientific magazine full of interesting articles, including many on chromatography.  I’ve had the pleasure of working with two of the minds behind this publication, Rich Whitworth and Frank van Geel, on a TAS GCxGC contribution, and have been impressed with the volume of quality work they’ve put […]

Determination of Chloropropanols in Soy Sauce: Part 1, Enter The Matrix

A while back I was doing some reading and came across an application of GC-MS in food safety that caught my attention. The analysis of food products, specifically soy sauce, for contamination with chloropropanols. So how do chlorinated alcohols end up in food? During the production of a food ingredient known as  hydrolyzed vegetable protein (HVP) various vegetable protein feedstocks […]

Peak Capacity in Capillary GC

Peak Capacity in capillary gas chromatography is different than sample loading capacity, which is something I’ve posted on multiple times recently in ChromaBLOGraphy.  Peak capacity is simply the number of theoretical peaks that can “fit” inside a chromatogram under some definition of how much they should be separated (e.g. baseline resolved or some other criterion).  […]

Using the Restek EZGC Method Translator to Assist in GC Column Trimming Maintenance

It is well known by people who analyze environmental and food safety matrices for semivolatile organic compounds like pesticides and PAHs that you occasionally have to trim the GC column to restore peak shapes degraded by nonvolatile matrix material that builds up on the inlet side of the column.  (As an aside, change that liner and […]