Archive for the ‘Tips & Tricks’ Category

Want to learn about “Injection Techniques in GC” or “Practical Maintenance and Troubleshooting in GC”? Sign up to join our half day course during Pittcon, Chicago.

Please join one of our courses presented next Pittcon in Chicago: “Injection Techniques in GC”:  Monday,  March 2,  08:30-12:00, Session: SC1230. “Practical maintenance and troubleshooting in Gas Chromatography”: Tuesday, March 3, 08:30-12:00, Session: SC1231 For location, visit short course office at S100C.   Injection Techniques in Gas Chromatography In Gas chromatography the most important process […]

Chiral separation on a C18 column? Separation of d- and l-amphetamines, Part II

To continue my blog part 1 (Part 1:https://blog.restek.com/?p=67087) , where I have briefly discussed the importance of separating the d and l isomers to accurately identify the illicit isomer using an achiral method on a Raptor C18 column employing a pre-column derivatization technique. Today I’d like to discuss more about the matrix of interest, sample […]

Falling Victim to One of LC’s Classic Blunders: Mismatching Your Diluent and Mobile Phase

An early lesson most of us learn in liquid chromatography is this: Always match your diluent to your mobile phase.  Once the exams are done, if you learned this in a college course, or your manager has walked away, you start flexing this “requirement” a little to see how matched they really need to be.  […]

Determining Optimal LC-MS/MS MRMs: Sensitivity is NOT Everything!

LC-MS/MS using electrospray ionization (ESI) is a widely used platform for routine target analysis and quantitation. However, one big challenge faced through the use of ESI is the presence of matrix effects. So, what are matrix effects and why are they important? Simply put, when matrix components coelute with the target analytes, they have the […]

GC Inlet Liner Selection, Part III: Inertness

The inlet liner is the first surface analytes will interact with after introduction into a GC.  It is critical that liners are deactivated, as a number of adverse interactions can occur between analytes and the glass surface.  Deactivations typically involve some type of silanization of the surface to cover active sites inherent in glass, such […]

Amines: Topaz or Base Deactivated Liners?

Amines can be difficult to analyze by GC, since they are active and adsorb to surfaces within the chromatographic system, including the inlet liner and the column.  This leads to loss of compound response, and peak tailing.  While deactivations can help to mitigate these effects, the quality of deactivations varies.  Primary amines are especially difficult, […]

What’s in your mouse feed?

When it comes to different types of GC techniques, headspace (HS) analysis is about as clean as they come. Typically, hundreds of injections can be made without doing any inlet maintenance or column trimming. It is one of my favorite techniques in the lab since it encompasses countless different unique applications. Even though HS is […]

Analyzing orange: peel and pulp separately or as whole?

Up to this point, I’ve focused on the optimization of QuEChERS salts and dSPE cleanup with fairly homogenous matrices. So, what about oranges? Should I peel them and analyze only the pulp? After all, that is the edible part. The peel is used as well – pressed into essential oils or scraped into zest. Besides, […]

Glycols…. Tis The Season!

Tis the season to be thinking about glycols…. Why you ask?  Well its currently winter as I’m writing this and glycols, specifically propylene glycol (PG) and ethylene glycol (EG), along with other ingredients, are used in airports for deicing planes.  Propylene glycol based fluids are more common since they are less toxic than ethylene glycol […]

GC Inlet Liner Selection, Part IIB: Split Liners Continued

My colleague, Alan Sensue, asked a couple of great questions in regards to my previous blog post on split liners.  To summarize, he was interested in what happens to responses for the various liners when you change split ratios.  For instance, if you go from a 20:1 split to a 40:1 split, do detected peak […]