Archive for the ‘Tips & Tricks’ Category

ASTM D 3606 17

Keep your benzene in check with ASTM D3606   While benzene historically has been used as an additive in gasoline and aviation fuel, it is a known toxic air pollutant and is regulated by both the EPA and European Union. While the ASTM has published both capillary and packed column methods this blog will focus […]

A Tale of Two Columns (CLPesticides and CLPesticides2)—Part III: Using the GC Accelerator Kit for Dual Column Analyses

In my previous two blogs (Part I and Part II), I mentioned the use of Restek’s GC Accelerator Oven Insert Kit (cat. #23849) for making your methods even faster.  The GC Accelerator kit was originally released with the intent of being used with an Agilent GC-MS system; however, this same kit can also be used […]

A Tale of Two Columns (CLPesticides and CLPesticides2)—Part II: Gaining Speed

In my previous blog post, I gave you a little history of the CLPesticides columns.  You’ll remember that I pointed out the 24 minute run times, which were promoted as being fast at the time.  Fortunately, there are ways to attain faster runs on this column pair for standard 8081 pesticides, due to their awesome […]

Pesticides are like Siblings – some get along well and some don’t – No. . .Really?

My colleague, Joe Konschnik and I have been asked by many food chemists out there about how much they can trust their pesticides mixes after they combine them into one single larger mixture for calibrating their instrument, or monitoring the accuracy and precision of their method – and rightfully so.  Well, like siblings, sometimes they […]

What dSPE works with spinach in GC-MS/MS analysis? #NationalSpinachDay

Today is a National Spinach Day! What is a better way to celebrate than to talk about spinach analysis? During part 1 of my blog series, I discussed what dSPE was best for celery. I found that most dSPE, with the exception of dSPE containing high amounts of graphitized carbon black (GBC), showed acceptable analyte recovery […]

Choosing the right dispersive SPE for GC-MS/MS analysis of celery

I’ve recently started experimenting with QuEChERS extractions for pesticide analysis. The available options are overwhelming, especially when it comes to dispersive solid phase extraction (dSPE) for the cleanup. For starters, I’ve been looking at the smaller volume dSPE (2 mL, summarized in Table 1), because I didn’t want to waste the raw material, solvents and […]

Sorry for the delay. Here is your chromatogram with and without the PFAS Delay Column.

Sometimes I hear this from customers: “I don’t need a delay column. I haven’t had any trouble without it so far.” It might be true. You may not have any issues without the delay column, especially when your samples are, for example, highly PFAS contaminated soil samples because the interference is too small to affect […]

Totally serious analysis of N2O – capillary column selection

A few years ago, Jaap wrote a blog, “Can I analyze NO, N2O and NO2 via GC?”, which received a vast response. If you are just starting to dive into the analysis of N2O, scroll through the blog comments where you can find many valuable insights from our blog readers. What I would like to […]

FAMEs blog part 4: Struggling with using hydrogen for AOCS methods Ce 1j-07 or Ce 1h-05?

This blog a part of a series: part 1, part 2, and part 3 Recently I came across customers’ issue with AOCS method Ce 1h-05 used with hydrogen as a carrier gas and I’ve decided to look more closely into what conditions are suggested for this analysis. While at it, I looked also into conditions of methods […]

FAMEs blog part 3: If I Use a Rt-2560 with my GC-MS will it explode?

This blog a part of a series: part 1, part 2, and part 4 Disclaimer: Do not use non-bonded columns, such as Rt-2560, in GC-MS for routine analysis! If you have the need to run some samples, here is what to expect (i.e. quite a bit of bleed) In my last blog, I talked about how […]