Archive for the ‘Faster Analyses’ Category

The Promise of True Peak Capacity Increase GCxGC Realized

I mentioned in my last ChromaBLOGraphy post, Phthalate-Free Personal Care Products?, that we used GCxGC-TOFMS to determine phthalates in a Las Vegas Wash water sample.  While it doesn’t dive into specific compound identification, we recently published the first demonstration of a near theoretical maximum peak capacity gain for GCxGC (approximately 9x) in an open access […]

Restek’s EZGC Online Suite that includes the Method Translator and Flow Calculator, and a Chromatogram Modeler, wins a TASIA Award – Chris Nelson, One of the Suite Builders

The Analytical Scientist is a very smartly produced scientific magazine full of interesting articles, including many on chromatography.  I’ve had the pleasure of working with two of the minds behind this publication, Rich Whitworth and Frank van Geel, on a TAS GCxGC contribution, and have been impressed with the volume of quality work they’ve put […]

Determination of Chloropropanols in Soy Sauce: Part 1, Enter The Matrix

A while back I was doing some reading and came across an application of GC-MS in food safety that caught my attention. The analysis of food products, specifically soy sauce, for contamination with chloropropanols. So how do chlorinated alcohols end up in food? During the production of a food ingredient known as  hydrolyzed vegetable protein (HVP) various vegetable protein feedstocks […]

Peak Capacity in Capillary GC

Peak Capacity in capillary gas chromatography is different than sample loading capacity, which is something I’ve posted on multiple times recently in ChromaBLOGraphy.  Peak capacity is simply the number of theoretical peaks that can “fit” inside a chromatogram under some definition of how much they should be separated (e.g. baseline resolved or some other criterion).  […]

Using the Restek EZGC Method Translator to Assist in GC Column Trimming Maintenance

It is well known by people who analyze environmental and food safety matrices for semivolatile organic compounds like pesticides and PAHs that you occasionally have to trim the GC column to restore peak shapes degraded by nonvolatile matrix material that builds up on the inlet side of the column.  (As an aside, change that liner and […]

Calculating your GC Column Length with the Restek EZGC Method Translator and Flow Calculator

Determining your GC column length is important so that electronic pneumatic control of carrier gas flow is accurate, whether during initial installation of the column or after maintenance column trimming. Otherwise, you can have more flow going into the detector than you think (especially problematic in MS as you might lose sensitivity) or even see […]

Multi/Multi Methods (MMM) in Food Analysis

More and more laboratories are facing more and more pressure in both, time and price. More work has to be done in shorter time. Customers are deciding on a cent-to-cent base per analysis whether they will place an order to one contract laboratory or to another. Production laboratories are requested for shorter Turn-Around-Times (TAT) to […]

Fast Determination of PAH and PCB in one Run

Environmental contract labs face a hard price pressure. To overcome this pressure, a trend into the direction of Multi/Multi Methods can be observed. If possible, more than one parameter group shall be determined and measured with one instrument without changing hardware. This implements a specific request for the separation power of the column used and […]

Using the Restek EZGC Method Translator and Flow Calculator to Support Shoot-and-Dilute GC Method Development – Going from GC-ECD to GC-MS

Hopefully some of you are following the Shoot-and-Dilute GC work (split injection) we’ve been doing in our lab, as it offers a way to keep your GC systems up longer by reducing the impact of dirty samples on inlet liner and column integrity.  After giving a lecture on the technique at the recent European Pesticide […]

Half the GC Column, Three Times Faster Analysis, Same Chromatogram!

Good things that happen when you go from a 30m x 0.25mm x 0.25µm GC column to a 15m x 0.25mm x 0.25µm GC column:  You do NOT lose resolution by a factor of 2 by with the 15m column. The sample loading capacity is about the same for the 15m column. With GC-MS, you […]